Rosie and Mabel go to work

Lookin awkward

Lookin’ awkward

It’s been so long since I’ve blogged something I made, I have entirely forgotten how to stand in interesting and flattering angles. Not that I was very good at it, but I was making a small amount of progress that is now forgotten. So apologies for the pictures of me looking like a sack of potatoes. The things I am blogging here are actually quite nice. I made some things I can wear to work and look sensible. Obviously I wear everything else I have made to work as well, but this stuff is actually workplace appropriate. I’m shocked!

Still awkward

Still awkward

I have made three Colette Mabels of late: I love a tight stretchy short skirt. They are all weirdly and wildly different. And two of them came up waaaay too big. And the other is very snug. Fabric choice matters folks. This one is made in some lovely embossed scuba from Fabric Godmother which is super comfy and lovely to sew with. Also: it doesn’t need hemming! JOY ALL ROUND.

Scuse knees, look at lack of hemming

Scuse knees, look at lack of hemming

I did something weird with cutting it out (I think I cut half the version with the button placket and the waist band without or something) and so I added an odd waist pleat in an homage to my Imagine Gnats skirt but I quite like it.

Room for expansion

Room for expansion

The Mabel pattern is great and I will make many. The first one I made was a quicky using less than a metre of left over fabric from the cardi I made for my Granny . I really didn’t have quite enough fabric so it is hemmed with the most miniscule hem and has gone all wavy

Wavy

Wavy

Also, it's REALLY short

Also, it’s REALLY short and my shirt has gone see through with the flash and my tights are very shiny

I put the centre strip thing (version 2) on this one, but the pattern is so busy you can’t see it, and I couldn’t be bothered to sew any buttons on because the hem is so wavy, and its really a bit too short to wear to many events. Or at least for being workplace appropriate.

I think my most successful one is my black quilted one. I wear this all the time , and as you can see, the cheap (£2.99 a metre from Minerva crafts) is beginning to pill, but I will wear it until it falls apart. It’s got wooden zebra buttons OH YEAH.

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It has a snazzy contrast facing at the waist which I made no attempt to get to sit inside as its snazzy and I wanted it to peek out. As you can also see it has a bit of blue jersey binding at the hem as this fabric frayed loads but was also bulky so I didn’t want to double fold it. This is a bit less stretchy than would be ideal, but looks a bit flash.

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This is a much better length and I like it a LOT. I bought loads of this quilted stuff in burgundy and black, and though it is disgusting to work with (it frays, its sticky and feels more like melted plastic than fabric) I’m going to make a matching raglan sleeve sweatshirt in it. It’s lovely warm and stretchy and looks ace.

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The top I am wearing with the blue Mabel is the Style Arc Rosie. Well I had to make a pattern with my name all over it didn’t I? Also I really like the style. It’s simple but interesting. As usual, the instructions are basically non existent, but this is quite simple and easy to work out. I definitely didn’t do the shoulder and neck facings quite right as they stick up and have too much fabric in both the versions I made: I think I should have done a lot more grading. Or at least some grading. Oh well.

Bum bustle

Bum bustle

It has a neat little inverted pleat at the back which I like a lot. I love this top: they are ideal for work. Smart but comfortable and not too traditional. The white on actually has very tiny flowers printed on it in a slightly whiter white than the fabric, but you can’t really see it in these photos.

Can you see it here?

Can you see it here? Not really!

I also made a version in some turquoise kona cotton I had bought before I realised quilting cotton was for quilting. D’oh. This actually works well for this type of simple top (apart from the bulky shoulders) but I think I look like I am wearing scrubs!

Doctor in the House

Doctor in the House

Oh and the neck has a pretty little button fastening.

Ain't that cute?

Ain’t that cute? Me being me, I had to use a contrast orange polka dot ribbon instead of the recommended self fabric.

So there we are. I made lots of clothes that I can wear for work with a cardi and look pretty smart. Maybe not my most interesting makes, but it can’t all be gold lame dresses sadly.

Have you made a work wardrobe?

The shirt that nearly destroyed my love of sewing.

Such pretty fabric, such a beastly pattern

Such pretty fabric, such a beastly pattern

I started making this shirt about 6 weeks ago, and three weeks and two crazy and confused muslins later, I had a wearable shirt that I love, but am still a little emotionally scarred by. This is entirely my own fault and the result of me getting a bit maverick. I decided to try a million new things at once. I mean, this is fairly inevitable as I am a beginner, and everything is new to me (I’m like a newborn baby here!) but knowing that, I probably shouldn’t have tried to make my first ever shirt from a company that is notorious for its extremely minimal instructions. I also probably shouldn’t have chosen a pattern from that company that was described as ‘medium to challenging’ and had features like a double yoke and a concealed button placket.  But hey. It is a really nice shirt design and I had some lovely Liberty tana lawn that was calling out to be made into a pretty floaty shirt.

So StyleArc Maggie, you nearly defeated me, but you also taught me a lot in the process of trying to make you. And my finished shirt is pretty fackin fabulous of I do say so myself. I’m allowed to say so, because I’m also going to show you the two abominations I made before I got to version 3.

First of all I will show you how big a pattern for a loose fit size 24 shirt is when it’s all printed on one piece of paper.

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It was a humungous untameable beast. The instructions however were MINIMAL to say the least. NO DIAGRAMS other than a cutting layout and very little in the way of descriptive writing. It assumed you know how to do everything from creating a fly front to attaching collars. The instructions for attaching the collar are thus: ‘With right sides facing sew the top edge of the collar, turn to the right side, flat stitch and press. Attach the top collar to the neckline, turn the under collars (sic) edge inwards and sink stitch around the neck’. I don’t know what flat stitching is. How do I attach the top collar? Which bit is the top collar? Where is the under collar? What is sink stitching? Basically, these instructions do not teach you how to do a thing. They assume you can do everything, and just tell you the order of construction. Though apparently the order can be a bit skew whiff. I know Style Arc produce a lot of patterns, and I know that not every pattern can be as good at teaching as Colette or Tilly, but this just made me feel stupid, and frustrated and I wanted to give up. It just all seemed like an impossible mountain to climb. I had to research every single instruction, and guess at a lot of things.  Some of these guesses were waaay off the mark. That’s why I made three versions. This wasn’t because I was adjusting the fit, I didn’t even attempt that, but it took three goes to understand the instructions. That seems silly to me.

Right, lets see what I made.

Number 1. In 99p per metre fabric. Why did I not realise that at that price it would barely be a fabric, but rather a collections of wispy strands barely attached to each other? Dear God this was difficult to cut and sew with, and that’s before I had even glanced at the impossible instructions. I totally failed to understand how to make a concealed placket, and I totally failed to make anything wearable.

The crumpled mess

The crumpled mess

Dreadful business.

Placket/finishing/life fail

Placket/finishing/life fail

So I tried again using some scraps of gingham and an old bed sheet from a charity shop. I also googled a lot and found that others were having trouble with the instructions, especially the placket. I got the placket just about right, but then managed to totally cock up the pleat at the bottom, giving me some kind of scissor effect.

Not so hot mess

Not so hot mess

I muddled through the yoke, with no help from the StyleArc tutorial which seemed to be for a shirt that was not already joined together, but I could not work out how to do the inverted pleat at the back of the yoke.

Wrong

Wrong

But after a lot of very heavy duty thinking and scratching my head and swearing and watching this tutorial I got the hang of it. I am very pleased with the results. I managed to do a proper yoke, a concealed placket, a curved hem, and buttons. Also, the fabric is awesome.

I ran out of red yoke poplin, but I like the contrast

I ran out of red yoke poplin, but I like the contrast

Here I am in it!

Ta da!

Ta da!

This is the back:

Hooray!

Hooray!

And here is my concealed placket

Now you see the buttons...

Now you see the buttons…

Now you don't!

Now you don’t!

There are still some things I’m not happy with: I had to finish the collar by hand as the instructions were totally useless about how to insert it, and I have never done this kind of collar before. And I’m rubbish at sewing by hand, so the tips of the collar look scruffy. I also placed the buttons in totally the wrong place: the top one is way too high, but if I unbutton it, the next one is too far down. DRAT. This is partly because I didn’t try it on and mark the button holes where I would like them, but also because so much handling and fiddling around with the placket to try and work out what the hell to do with it rubbed my chalk marks off. The whole thing was so confusing and infuriating I lost the will to live and just wanted it over so I could move on to something that didn’t make me want to scream.

All in all, I love the style of this shirt, and I am proud that I persevered. I’m not much of a ‘completer/finisher’, so I had to use a lot of willpower to not give up and move on to something more fun that I could understand without taking a degree in dressmaking first. The fabric helped. I loved it, and wanted to use it. I didn’t want to spoil it. I had to understand the pattern properly before I cut anything and I couldn’t just bodge my way through. It was an excellent exercise in concentration and self discipline, though I won’t thank StyleArc for it! I will use their patterns again after a period of recovery, but I think I will choose one of their ‘Easy’ makes. And take a few valium, drink whiskey and practice yoga while I’m at it.

Have you had a positive experience of StyleArc?