Nautical Imagine Gnats Alder Skirt and a made up top

Jaunty

Jaunty

What’s an alder? Loads of patterns seem to be called alder. I don’t think anything is called alder in the UK.

Nautical!

Nautical!

Anyway, I made an awesome if slightly unflattering skirt from boat print fabric. I used the Imagine Gnats alder pattern and some lovely chambray and a bit of some handwoven cotton for the contrast fabric. I made it with the bulging pockets because I was fascinated by them.

I can put EVERYTHING IN THESE!

I can put EVERYTHING IN THESE!

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They do make your waist look smaller, but they also make you generally wider, and my mum kept thinking I was wearing an apron. I don’t mind that, but I think next time I make it, and I will make it again, I will make the flat pocket version. I like the triangular inverted pleat at the front: there is a version you can make without it, but I think it’s a cute detail.

awkward selfie to show off pleat

awkward selfie to show off pleat

When I make it next, I will also cut a size smaller: it comes up HUGE! I used a much smaller piece of elastic at the back and gathered the fabric a lot more than I was supposed to but it was still massive! I did secretly like being too small for something though 😉

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I will also make it about three inches longer. The pattern has options for doing this, but despite being tall I ignored this. It came up a bit short (even with me adding decorative contrast binding round the bottom which isn’t part of the pattern but which I like) so I will make it a bit smaller and longer.

All the topstitching

All the topstitching, neat in places, not in others…..

All the seams are topstitched which I think is super nice. It’s a really cool pattern: hooray for Imagine Gnats. I like how the patterns have ample opportunity for playing with patterns and colours, and am looking forward to making the Bess top soon.I also like the large size range (the skirt goes up to 22 which is what this is) and the fact the sizes come up large. I reckon size 24 to 26 could fit in this with the elastic at the waist.

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The top is sort of self drafted, ok it isn’t. I copied an RTW vest I liked and then attached the Moneta sleeves to it. The joys of knit when you can just bodge things into place. The sleeves didn’t quite fit so I added a couple of pleats at the shoulders to poof them up a bit and give me the shoulders I wasn’t born with! It’s made from the same fabric as my first successful Moneta, and it very snug and very useful.

'Drafting' LOLZ

‘Drafting’ LOLZ

And there we are: a jaunty summer outfit just as it starts to get really cold. PERFECT!

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32 thoughts on “Nautical Imagine Gnats Alder Skirt and a made up top

  1. The skirt came out very cute! I wonder if you could make a pleat in the top of the pocket (maybe press it down to make it flatter), then put a button and buttonhole there to reduce the width at the hips. It might drive you batty if you use those pockets a lot, though.

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  2. I hadn’t seen this skirt on anybody over a size 8 and the models all seem to have their hands in the pockets which when taken out – yes- I see the apron reference.
    I do like the band on the hem line. Very balanced.

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  3. ha! I hear you on the pockets… I have one with the fun pockets and it doesn’t get much wear, honestly. I think maybe a size 8 or 10 is the cut-off for bulgy pockets being wearable? it would be perfect for apple picking though, so there’s a plan for fall? 😉 definitely can’t wait to see your next version and your bess!

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  4. I think there’s a department store in Croydon called Alders but that doesn’t really bring us any closer to finding out what and Alder actually is… Anyway, nice job on the skirt – the fabric’s really cute and I love the pleat detail!

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    • Hahaha! I love the idea of American pattern designers naming things after a department store on Croydon! Glorious Croydon! I have a feeling Alder is a type of tree, but I prefer the department store explanation!

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      • What a genius idea for a clothing line, pick shops in a town in another country and name them after that. I’m pretty sure Alder is a tree/bush thing too, but that doesn’t help with Bess. I wonder if it’s an American thing that we’ll never get unless helped. (Hmm, if only I could design patterns, I could name them all after particularly British English words to spread international confusion. My American friend whose been over here more than a decade and is fluent in Britishisms was floored by his wife’s use of the word Rozzer the other day. And my American flatmate at uni was stumped by Hoover. So I could have Rozzer Trousers, Hoover Top,…..)

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  5. Hi! Love the skirt! I’m with you, anything with pockets… have you tried Vogue 7910? It has a lovely angled and huge pocket; whenever I wear it my sewing acquaintances always say “I didn’t know that pattern had pockets!”
    Thought you might like to know, alder is a tree in the birch family; I think it is native to North America, we usually use it for smoking fish and meats as well as on the barbeque.
    I’ll have to look for that pattern company, I’ve not heard of it before – thanks for sharing I like learning something new!

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  6. I’ve made this once and agree re both sizing and the pockets. I don’t care how small you are, the pockets have a very apron like feel, so will redo with the flat pockets eventually, although most of my friends quite like the pockets and they are certainly capacious :). I love your nautical theme – it looks such fun.

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  7. Your sewing skills have improved so much in the past few months! I’m so impressed! I know the pockets on this skirt are daffy, but the construction looks great! It’s cute and well executed and fits you really well.

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  8. Pingback: Rosie and Mabel go to work | sparkleneedles

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